Heating Rate Of A Solution | Science Experiment

by | Jul 3, 2022 | Chemistry, Experiments

Introduction

In this article, we will be experimenting to find out how much a solution gets heated by the light, i.e., the heating rate of a solution and the factors which affect the Heating rate of a solution. We will be using solutions’ absorbance spectra to predict their heating by light.

Basic Building Concept

1. Whenever you create different types of solutions, you must be amazed to see that the different solutions have different heating rate properties.

2. By touching different solutions, we can tell how much a solution is heated.

3. But how is it possible that some solutions are strongly heated, some are less heated, and some did not get heated in a particular period of time.

4. We will be dealing with this behaviour of solutions in this experiment. We will find the factors which affect the rate at which a solution gets heated.

Aim

To find out how much a solution gets heated by the light and the factors on which the heating rate of a solution depends.

Requirements

1. A computer,

2. A tungsten bulb,

3. A sharpie ink solution,

4. A laser

Theory

1. The heating rate of a solution does not depend on the concentration of the solution.

2. The heating rate of a solution depends on the wavelength of light absorbed by the solution.

Procedure

Step 1: On your computer, using excel, create a program for predicting the heating effect of a solution under a given source of lightning.

Step 2: With the help of the Yabasic programming language, you have to create a program that can generate fake absorbance spectra for imaginary solutions for their comparison.

Step 3: To test the solution in real, use the sharpie ink solution with a laser and a tungsten bulb.

Heating Rate Of A Solution | Science Experiment | Yabasic Absorbance Spectra

Yabasic Programming Language

Observation

1. On comparing those artificial spectra, we found that the rate at which a solution is heated is not directly proportional to the concentration of the solution.

2. The solutions having total absorbance can heat differently due to the absorption of different wavelengths by the solutions.

3. The two things which can predict the heating rate of solutions are colour and darkness.

4. The program found out that the heating effect of sharpie ink solution held close to the tungsten is only 3.08 X 10^(-5) degrees in more than twelve minutes, which means the heating rate is very small as predicted.

5. Experimenting with lasers showed the accuracy of the model within 8%.

Result

1. Heating rate and concentration do not depend on each other.

2. Absorbance logarithm depends on energy.

3. Two different but equally absorbing solutions get heated differently because of the light source, which emits different spectrums.

4. Colors and darkness are the predictors of heating rate.

Precautions

1. Make sure that the program is running properly.

2. Use the correct mathematical model.

3. Measure the result correctly.

Conclusion

In this way, we found out how much a solution gets heated by the light and the factors on which it depends.

Viva Question with Answers

Q.1 What was the aim of your experiment?

ANS. To find out how much a solution gets heated by the light and the factors on which the heating rate of the solution depends.

Q.2 Does the heating rate of a solution depends upon the concentration of that solution?

ANS. No, the heating rate of the solution does not depend upon the concentration of that solution.

Q.3 On what factor does the heating rate of a solution depend?

ANS. The heating rate of a solution depends on the wavelength of light absorbed and energy.

Q.4 What did the program find out about the heating rate of the sharpie ink solution placed close to the tungsten bulb?

ANS. The program found out that the heating effect of sharpie ink solution held close to the tungsten is only 3.08 X 10^(-5) degrees in more than twelve minutes.

Q.5 Name the things which can predict the rate at which a solution gets heated?

ANS. The two things that can predict solutions’ heating rate are colour and darkness.

 

You May Also Like To Create…

Chemiluminescence

Chemiluminescence

Introduction In this experiment, we will be determining the efficiency of light produced by...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.